Southern Oregon and the Trinity Alps

As the summer has gone on and flowers have become harder to find, I’ve slacked off on my botanizing. The past week, I took a trip way up North to the Trinity Alps in North-West California, even sneaking into Oregon. While these are great places for weird and rare plants (see post from a year ago), this time, the late season and complete lack of botanical planning did me in. To be fair, plants weren’t my top priority this time. I did, however, scrounge up 10 post-worthy plants that I hadn’t previously photographed. First, here’s a picture of the beautiful and under-visited Trinities from near the Boulder Lakes with one of my favorite plants from my last trip here–Darlingtonia california (California pitcher plant, Sarraceniaceae), in the foreground.

2017-08-04 16.24.15

Okay, flowers in in no particular order: Calochortus tolmiei (Hairy Star Tulip, Liliaceae)

Calochortus_tolmiei

Nothochelone nemorosa (False Turtlehead, Plantaginaceae)

Nothochelone_nemorosa

Another large, pink, bee pollinated flower Mimulus lewisii (Lewis’s Monkeyflower, Phyrmaceae)

Mimulus_lewisii

Gentianopsis simplex (Hiker’s Fringed Gentian, Gentianaceae), a species actually more common in the Sierras than in Northwestern California

Gentianopsis_simplex

 

Rudbeckia occidentalis (Western Coneflower, Asteraceae). This species, unlike some others in the genus doesn’t have showy yellow ray flowers surrounding the brown disk flowers, but pollinators seem to find it just fine, anyway.

Rudbeckia_occidentalis

Pedicularis racemosa (Leafy Lousewort, Orobanchaceae), one of the few species with asymmetric flowers.

Pedicularis_racemosa

Cordylanthus tenuis (Slender Birdsbeak, Orobanchaceae)

Cordylanthus_tenuis

Goodyera oblongifolia (Western Rattlesnake Plantain, Orchidaceae)

Kopsiopsis strobilacea (California Groundcone, Orobanchaceae). This completely parasitic plant really does look like a pine cone sitting on the ground when it’s in flower. This individual is fruiting.

Kopsiopsis_strobilacea

Another plant with a great common name is Vancouveria hexandra (Northern Inside Out Flower, Berberidaceae). This is the first picture I’ve posted of this family, which also includes Oregon Grape (Berberis)

Vancouveria-hexandra

And finally, Trichostema simulatum (Siskiyou Bluecurls). Last post I talked about looking for the rare pink-flowered morph of the related Trichostema laxum. I found a whole pink-flowered population of this, more northern species.

Trichostema_simulatum

I’ll probably squeeze in one more post this year before going dormant for the fall and winter. I’m going to completely leave California behind to do it.

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One thought on “Southern Oregon and the Trinity Alps

  1. The pink simulatum is great. Its is easy to grow if you are interested in mendelian genetics of that one. I have normal colored seed here that you could cross to it.

    Almost done my ramblings for the year – drove 6000+ miles, but have all but one Abronia/Tripterocalyx now. Whenever you have downtime from teaching, come up and visit or Kathy and I will get down there. I’ll get Tricho stuff in order too. I didn’t get much data this year, the nyctags took way more time than I expected, but I got some and we ought to write up some papers…

    Like

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